women’s history

BFTP Friday Hoyden: Ching Shih

Feminist Frequency in its new series, #OrdinaryWomen: Daring to Defy History, is continuing its run of making awesome little profiles of awesome women who we’ve already profiled here at some time in the distant past. This time it’s nineteenth century… Read More ›

Reimagining the C.W.A.

Guest Post by Alex Skud Bayley


…mutual support, community service, skill-building, learning about issues facing women both locally and overseas, and advocacy on behalf of women. So far so good! So why is it that, on the whole, the Country Women’s Association is so ossified?

Friday Hoyden: Rosie Hackett

This month, Dublin City Council voted to name the new bridge over the river Liffey ‘Rosie Hackett Bridge’. This was in response to a huge campaign from Dubliners, mostly women, who felt Rosie was due a decent and long-lasting public memorial. All of the 16 previously existing bridges in the city are named after men. Rosie Hackett was a pioneering trade unionist who co-founded the Irish Women Workers’ Union (IWWU) in 1911.

Chivalry

On a whim, I just followed one of the “Related Posts” links at the bottom of today’s Quick Hit from Mindy, and found my way to her earlier link to a post at The Hairpin about a book of poems by Alice Duer Miller, published in 1915.

Friday Hoyden: Emily Davison

Three days ago marked 100 years since the day Emily Wilding Davison, carrying out a suffragist political protest, was trampled by racehorses at the Epsom Derby and later died. I always heard it told as “threw herself under the King’s horse”, but informed discussion around the incident suggests that I shouldn’t make such a simple, firm statement about what happened. What we must not forget is how brutal the response was to all forms of activism by women demanding something as basic as the vote.

Friday Hoyden: Hrotsvit von Gandersheim

Hrotsvit, whose name is also recorded as Roswitha, and in other variations, lived in the Abbey of Gandersheim, which is in the region known today as Saxony, in the second half of the tenth century. The dark ages may not have been quite so dark if you were a noble-born, highly educated nun, with a rather quirky sense of humour.

Giveaway: Why Study Women’s History?

“Working with college students, I often recall myself as a sophomore at Barnard College in 1966. I wanted nothing to do with women’s movements or women’s history. When my advisor, Annette Baxter, suggested that I enroll in her course on U.S. women’s history, I had the nerve to reply that I would rather study “real” history.”

In 1-3 paragraphs, how would you have responded to the young Ms Freedman, and to women like her?