war

Media Circus: Lest We Forget edition

The enduring lesson I learnt about ANZAC Day from the family members who served in either/both World Wars is that political incompetence costs lives, and that the sacrifices made by the dead are best honoured by the rest of us keeping a really close eye on our political class. I wish our mainstream media understood this ongoing need for vigilance better right now.

What’s piqued your media interests lately?

Me and my suspicious mind

I just really hope that the film producers planning to turn a profit by telling of the horrors visited on one group of disadvantaged children had the grace to pass on those very robust film set buildings that they were so very proud of to people who could turn them to good use for other disadvantaged children.

Lest We Forget

Because it’s Anzac Day, I’ve spent much of my time looking over the various diaries/letters of my greatuncles who took part in the Great War.

An extraordinary woman

Eileen Nearne was never appreciated by her male superior officers. The way they speak of her is awful. Mark Dunton, contemporary history specialist with the National Archives, said a none-too-subtle sexism seems to blame. “Her training officers completely underestimated her,”… Read More ›

Remembering Anzac Day: stark lessons squandered and myths reinforced

I have little to add to these quoted comments below from Paul Norton’s Anzac Day post at LP, which focuses on the militaristic myth side of Anzac Day. As usual, there are some illiterates objecting to the use of the word “myth” as if the word means “untrue in its entirety”. The usage of “myth” when discussing recent history always, of course, nearly always refers to the meanings 2b and 2c below:

Women on the front line

Guest Hoyden Mindy also blogs for ecelectic group blog For Battle! This issue is back in the news again, with the announcement that the DSTO is looking at the combat roles available in the army, previously denied to women on… Read More ›