war

Tutu on Darfur

Last week Desmond Tutu wrote a piece for the The Sunday Times to mark the International Day of Action for Darfur on the 17th September. I didn’t know about that Day of Action, despite our fundraising for MSF in Darfur on Larvatus Prodeo not long ago: how many of us did?

Tutu’s article, A blind eye to genocide, makes for uncomfortable reading:

In Darfur 2m people have been ethnically cleansed since 2003, women and girls are systematically raped and tortured daily, there is cholera in the refugee camps and the violence is spilling into next door Chad, and all without the attention, or response, it deserves.

Suddenly, no-one’s named after Saddam anymore

From the International Herald Tribune:

The country’s Sunni-Shiite bloodletting is driving many Iraqis to bury the very essence of their identity: their names.

To have to hide one’s name is considered deeply shameful. But with sectarian violence surging, Iraqis fear that the name on an identification card, passport or other document could become an instant death sentence if seen by the wrong people.

Could I have a little less Islamofascism in my coffee?

Deltoid takes a few more whacks at his favourite pinata, Tim Blair. Tim Lambert channels Monty Python’s Spam sketch in response to Blair asking his fanboys whyowhy couldn’t ABC science wonk Robyn Williams write a book on the flaws in fundamentalist Islam instead of on the flaws of Intelligent Design “theory”?

Indeed, to get all subeditorly as Blair so likes to do (inserted obligatory cliches start here in bold), what unmitigated gall from Williams, writing about anything other than The Greatest Threat to Western Civilisation Evah(TM).

Kovco questions

Just a quick acknowlegement that my previous post on Anzac Day which referred to Pvt. Kovco’s death from a firearm discharge in a secure area strongly implied that Pvt. Kovco committed suicide, and with fuller information I now realise that… Read More ›

Lest We Forget

Because it’s Anzac Day, I’ve spent much of my time looking over the various diaries/letters of my greatuncles who took part in the Great War. (Various cousins-once-removed and second-cousins have transcribed them over the years and sent out copies to… Read More ›

For the fallen

The news of Australia’s first military fatality in Iraq, which came just before Anzac Day, is a timely reminder of the fact that people at home in suits make decisions that cost soldiers overseas in uniform their lives. And those… Read More ›