Quick Hit: If she was a man

would this even be a story at all?



Categories: gender & feminism, media

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9 replies

  1. Why, how DARE she demand any say at all in how the magazine used her likeness? And why did she need people to be quiet so she could concentrate on answering BRW’s questions – doesn’t she realise that teh modelz should just giggle and simper flirtatiously while regurgitating standard airhead soundbites?
    Somebody call the Waaambulance for the poor widdle journo who couldn’t enjoy the simultaneous ogling and patronising he was expecting.

  2. And she shouted, my word, the wrongness of it all. Nor would she tell them how much she was worth. Goodness me the hide of that woman. Hang on, I think I can hear the waaaambulance now. Hopefully it’s bringing some pearls to clutch and a fainting couch.

  3. Fancy not engaging in model-like behaviour when you are being interviewed by a business magazine about your business interests.
    It’s outrageous.

  4. Unsurprisingly, exactly what I thought. *head desk*

  5. As soon as I saw the headline I thought, I bet it turns out to be the bog-standard behaviour of any senior level businessman.

  6. I don’t think shouting is ideal for anyone in the workplace (indoors/white collar, I mean, sporting instructors builders and the like excepted!) however I would have liked to be a fly on the wall at that interview to see exactly what her level of voice was. I’d be prepared to bet that what the journo called “shouting” was merely what in a male businessman would be described as raising your voice above an interruption, or being “commanding”.
    I have a couple of male work colleagues who can bully and terrify to the max in quite a low tone of voice.

  7. I’d be prepared to bet that what the journo called “shouting” was merely what in a male businessman would be described as raising your voice above an interruption, or being “commanding”.
    Very likely.

  8. I’d be prepared to bet that what the journo called “shouting” was merely what in a male businessman would be described as raising your voice above an interruption, or being “commanding”.
    Myself and many other female teachers I have spoken too have had similar experiences. On many occassions we’ve had (usually male) students take umbridge with us behaving in the abovemention manner, yet say nothing when a male teacher uses the same tone or volume of voice.

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