What’s missing from local government election blurbs

I’m looking through my local government voting papers. Issues that are on the radar in the candidate blurbs:

– A healthy lifestyle for our children

– beautification of streetscapes

– Make the city environmentally friendly

– encourage a sense of community

– “be a voice for the disabled members of our community” (I have a voice, thankyou.)

– improve road safety

– reduce crime

– reduce graffiti

– safety of senior citizens

– parking fees

– height policy for buildings on the coast

– thugs

– more parking

– paying less to a CEO

– buy local to encourage local jobs

– strong leadership

– respect

– accountability

– upgrading parks

– hoons

– traffic management systems

– Ocean Reef marina

– economic audit

– anti-social behaviour

– youth facilities

– improved sports reserves

– preservation of local bushland

Things that are not on the radar of a single local government candidate:

Accessibility.

Is there any reason I should bother?



Categories: Politics

Tags: , , ,

7 replies

  1. Obviously being a voice for you negates the need for you to be able to move around your community. Or something. FAIL.
    Beautifications of streetscapes always makes me think – put gardens in and make footpaths narrow and hard for two people to pass on, much less get a wheelchair or scooter down.

  2. Of course it’s far more important to make streets beautiful than for people to be able to negotiate them. And yet, yet, we still keep putting in ugly, obstructive barriers on footpaths. Keeping bikes out trumps Teh Pretty; allowing PWD to move around in the world doesn’t.

  3. Picket his office with a big sign: I don’t need your voice I need a ramp.

  4. DEM: Her office, though I don’t think she has one (yet).

  5. Oh, that reminds me of when I called every candidate in our federal election to ask if their office was wheelchair accessible (we have offices during elections). One of them took three days to answer this question, and another insisted they did, and then when we showed up, they didn’t.

  6. Sorry, Queenslander. Polliegals were few and far between (with a few notable exceptions like the former member for Oxley) when I was growing up. Like the Conservatives in the UK still, you had to really struggle to get a woman past the local association members and onto the shortlist. Johs Queensland – like Palin’s Alaska but with cane toads rather than moose.

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