Update: Seal Press and Amanda Marcotte respond to racist artwork in Jungle quagmire

Update 27 Apr 2008: profbwoman at WOC PhD has an formidable series.

Why Seal Press is OFF the Syllabus

Don’t Mess With Feminist Press

Why Seal Press is Off the Syllabus pt. 2

Celebrating Feminist and Multicultural Presses: Publishers that Rock!

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Update: Seal Press has just responded to the people criticising their artwork in Amanda Marcotte’s “It’s A Jungle Out There” book as racist and colonialist. The apology is here:.

Friday, April 25, 2008
A Public Apology
To Our Readers, Our Friends, Our Critics,

We are taking action immediately to remove the offensive images from It’s A Jungle Out There. We are currently reprinting, and we will make these changes now. We apologize for any pain or concern these images have caused.

We do not believe it is appropriate for a book about feminism, albeit a book of humor, to have any images or illustrations that are offensive to anyone.

Some have asked the valid question, “What were you thinking?”

Please know that neither the cover, nor the interior images, were meant to make any serious statement. We were hoping for a campy, retro package to complement the author’s humor. That is all. We were not thinking.

As an organization, we need to look seriously at the effects of white privilege. We will be looking for anti-racist trainings offered here in the Bay Area. We want to incorporate race analysis into our work.

In the meantime, please know that all involved in the publishing of It’s A Jungle Out There, from editorial to production were not trying to send a message to anyone about our feelings regarding race. If taken seriously as a representation of our intentions, these images are also not very feminist. By putting the big blonde in the skimpy bathing suit with the big breasts, the tiny waist, and the weapon on our cover, we are also not asserting that she is any kind of standard that anyone should aspire to. This 1950s Marvel comic is not an accurate reflection of our beauty standards, our beliefs regarding one’s right to bear arms, nor our perspectives on race relations, foreign policy, or environmental policy.

We also extend this apology to the author, Amanda Marcotte, who did not select these images for her book. Writing humor is very difficult. While our intention was to complement your words, we see that these images have had the opposite effect, and for that, we are sorry.

Sincerely and humbly,

Krista Lyons-Gould and Brooke Warner

My response is in the comments thread.

Good for you for owning up to it, and for taking action. (Is the exact action outlined?)

I do take issue with your apparent attempt to equate the use of the sexist imagery with the use of the racist imagery. They are very, very different situations. It can be possible, in some circumstances, for a woman writer to reclaim sexist language or images. What is NOT possible is for a _white_ writer to reclaim racist, colonisalist imagery.

We shouldn’t let any of our feminist sisters get away with this, any more so than we let men get away with cracking rape jokes. You don’t get to joke around about oppression or try to “reclaim” — when you’re the oppressor.

Further edit 26 apr 2008: Amanda Marcotte has apologised for this artwork, but without any of the “It was a joke!” weasel-wording that SP used.

I’m sorry

I’m sorry. Plain and simple. I didn’t pick the offensive imagery in my book, but I should have caught it sooner than now. I didn’t and there’s no excuse. It was my first book, I was excited and happy, but I needed to have a more critical eye. I would do anything to remove racist images from the first printing of the book if I could, and I am relieved and happy to say that they will be removed from future printings. Seal Press has their note of apology up too, and they accept full responsibility for these mistakes. I really recommend reading it.

I can understand why anyone would choose to boycott a book with these images, and I respect that choice. Hopefully, once they are removed, people will reconsider supporting the book if they like the content. I, for one, will be ripping the pages out of my copy but keeping them as a reminder to be alert. Thank you to everyone who’s engaged in a conversation that’s been tough for me but productive nonetheless.

This is pretty much what I’ve got to say. I welcome your feedback below. I imagine things might get pretty intense, so I may not choose to say much more than this, but know that I’m reading and listening and respect your thoughts very much. Once again, I apologize for the images, my overlooking them, and any hurt this may have caused.



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34 replies

  1. Good for them for writing a comprehensive apology admitting their error and promising to receive training in racial issues analysis (and to apply it) in their future publishings.
    I’m a bit confused by the first line in your quoted comment though

    Is the exact action outlined?

    Didn’t they explain that in the very first paragraph?

    We are taking action immediately to remove the offensive images from It’s A Jungle Out There. We are currently reprinting, and we will make these changes now.

    Or were you referring to the “exact action” with respect to racial analysis training.

  2. I definitely should have been clearer there, sorry. I was wondering what will be done with the books already printed, whether in the warehouse, bookstores, or out in the community.
    (Kinda interested in the racism training too, but more on a “curiosity” level.)
    Lauredhel’s last blog post..Update: Seal Press responds to racist artwork in Jungle quagmire

  3. Amanda’s apology was good – a straight forward “I’m sorry.” She didn’t even try to blame Seal Press; she just said sorry.
    I’m not so sure about the apology from Seal Press.

    We do not believe it is appropriate for a book about feminism, albeit a book of humor, to have any images or illustrations that are offensive to anyone.

    It’s the “offensive to anyone” that makes it weasely to me. That puts it in the area of “we’re sorry if we offended anyone”, not “these images were offensive.”

  4. I’m starting to wonder whether at least some of the many people who use the “offensive to anyone” formulation are more guilty of having a tin ear and an unthinking reliance on cliche rather than being deliberately weaselly.
    We’ve heard so many politicians/broadcasting personalities use the “offensive to anyone” weasel words that I think to some people, who don’t hear the dog-whistle, then those words are they ones they feel that they are expected to say if they are ever called out for offensive behaviour.
    I don’t know the Seal Press people well enough to say whether they fall into the tin ear or the weasel category.

  5. I’m so reassured that they are just your ignorant everyday garden variety style of racist and not the meanie intentional racist sort. Cuz everyone knows that only the intentional meanie stuff counts.

  6. thebewilderness (#5): That wasn’t what I meant to imply with my tin ear comment, if that’s what you were directly responding to. Of course they both count, and privilege consists of not realising how much your unintentional acts can affect others. That privilege is what needs to be addressed.
    There is still nonetheless an important difference between people who act deliberately and those who blunder, isn’t there? Blunderers can be educated to be less clumsy, can’t they?

  7. Seal Press has added an update in which they acknowledge that they undermined their own apology and state; “We acknowledge that the images are racist and not okay under any circumstances”.

  8. I think what thebewilderness is saying is that the response from Seal Press has a distinct “we didn’t mean to and we were trying to be funny, so get a sense of humor and get over it” flavor to it, especially taken in context with their now-internet-legendary response to Blackamazon. They’re sick of being called out for their blatant racism, and it shows, even in this apology. (What’s getting to me is that I don’t think they ever really apologized to Blackamazon for their comments on her blog, a much more personal affront to antiracist activists, but they’re apologizing with this very public display of racism. It shouldn’t have taken this much attention to get them to apologize and start changing their ways. Maybe I missed their apologies to Blackamazon, though.)
    But I’m also really glad that they all stepped up, apologized, and are working to correct the situation (as much as it can be corrected). I hope the SP folks follow through with their promise to engage with antiracist discourse with more commitment, both in their personal lives and in their professional work.

  9. L: Definitely. Only addressing the most public and recent issue, and only addressing that when it started to look like it might threaten their cash flow, and addressing it in a weaselish way that then had to be revised, is nowhere near far enough.
    To really do the right thing, they need to reach out to ALL of the people they have insulted and abused, with a genuine and heartfelt apology. Maybe this will be part of their Antiracist 12 Step Programme or whatever they’re planning.

  10. L, thanks for the interpretation of thebewilderness’ comment.
    thebewilderness, my apologies for failing to discern where you were coming from (assuming that L has got it pegged).
    I agree: Seal Press has not been as responsive as it could be, and certainly their responses have not been entirely convincing. Definitely still rating a “Could Do Much Better” on the report card.

  11. {sigh}
    Aaaaand it’s All About The White Women AGAIN.
    I’ve grown up being very suspicious of apologies, since often people use them strategically to delegitimise the challenges people are putting to them and merely repeat past wrongs.
    For reference, see Rudd’s apology to the Stolen Generations. For many Aboriginal people, especially those living in the Territory, it’s meaningless. And if you want to be cynical about it, it’s an attempt to capitalise on feel-good race politics while actually depoliticising Aboriginal affairs.
    And here it’s the same thing. No actual sense of what these images do or the pervasiveness of racial oppression for people of colour. Just a focus on the minutiae of middle-class white women’s actions, as if that’s supposed to overwrite the actual damage that Amanda’s done and will continue to do.
    And just like Rudd, her critics are being herded off by sycophantic white supporters — whites all in dialogue with each other over what racism “really” is, rather than any accountability to people of colour.
    Accountability doesn’t come from a statement. It comes from real hard work, over long periods of time. And in that respect, Seal Press and Amanda Marcotte have proven themselves untrustworthy and not accountable at all. At this point, there is no point trusting these women. There’s no point in “reform”. I’m consistently baffled why you white women who call yourselves “anti-racist” bother with it.
    Right now, there’s only a bunch of hard work left to do. No more picking over this sorry business.

  12. L:

    the response from Seal Press has a distinct “we didn’t mean to and we were trying to be funny, so get a sense of humor and get over it” flavor to it, especially taken in context with their now-internet-legendary response to Blackamazon.

    Yup. And Blackamazon is now off the air, which is yet another travesty in this whole sorry business.
    Fire Fly:

    I’ve grown up being very suspicious of apologies, since often people use them strategically to delegitimise the challenges people are putting to them and merely repeat past wrongs.

    I’m in 100% agreement. I threw the apologies up[1] here not as an endorsement of them or in an effort to try to convince people to accept them, at all. I’m sorry that I didn’t make that clear.
    My overall strong impression is that they are doing bare minimums, if that, as a purely business decision.

    For reference, see Rudd’s apology to the Stolen Generations. For many Aboriginal people, especially those living in the Territory, it’s meaningless. And if you want to be cynical about it, it’s an attempt to capitalise on feel-good race politics while actually depoliticising Aboriginal affairs.

    Yes. I remember being cynical about it at the time. Back then I looked and looked for writings or statements or interviews by Indigenous people deconstructing and criticising the apology and the rhetoric around it, but I didn’t find much (which is not to say it wasn’t there, at all – I could have been looking in the wrong places). If you have any links handy, and would be willing to share them, I’d appreciate it.

    Accountability doesn’t come from a statement. It comes from real hard work, over long periods of time. And in that respect, Seal Press and Amanda Marcotte have proven themselves untrustworthy and not accountable at all.

    I agree – it’s a pattern of behaviour in each case, not a single fuckup. One mealy-mouthed or backhanded or bare-minimum apology is nowhere near enough for me, and I don’t expect it to be for the people who were wronged.
    [1] Heh. Metaphor unintended, but apropos.

  13. Re: Rudd’s apology
    I only have word of mouth from Aboriginal people who I know, and who’ve travelled from the NT to tell the story. You might want to check out the press release that the Aboriginal Rights Coalition put out before the apology was made for a bit more background.
    Re: Marcotte’s/Seal Press’ apology
    Your disclaimer about not pressuring anyone to accept doesn’t seem to follow from the actual outcome of the widespread white focus on this, which is that there are a whole bunch of white people in a gesture of acceptance of these apologies on behalf of poc.

  14. Thanks for that link, I’ve added it to my feeds.
    I’m not quite sure what you’re getting at with your second para – I can only speak to my own intentions and thought process, and my recollection is that I slapped these up at oh-dark-thirty without comment (I don’t write well at certain times of day), for people to make up their own minds. I think I’ve stated my personal opinion reasonably clearly now (if I haven’t and you’re interested, I’m happy to clarify further here or in email).
    I don’t speak for the white USAn femiblogosphere and they don’t speak for me, and I sure as eggs don’t speak for POC. But if you choose to not believe me at face value, I’m not going to argue or storm off. You’ve got good reasons not to.

  15. I mean, who the hell are people like Hugo Schwyzer, yourselves, Plain(s)feminist, or any other white person, to “thank” Brooke, Krista or Amanda for their apologies? What do you see yourselves achieving by that?
    All I see is white people patting each other on the back.

  16. Fire Fly, I do see your point. That’s why I was very careful not to “thank” anybody involved.
    I did say “good for them” here. I did say “I’m glad you wrote this” over at Pandagon. That is definitely expressing some approval that they made the gesture, but I totally agree that it’s not my place to “thank” any of them on anyone else’s behalf.
    Perhaps that’s a distinction without a difference. I hope not, because I was attempting to be very careful with my language. But I may well not have been careful enough.

  17. I’m sorry I wasn’t clear.
    My remarks were directed at the 11th hour apology from AM and Seal Press. Not at anything said in the thread. I’m so angry about this that I am obviously incoherent.
    I simply don’t believe them, nor do I accept their apology. If you behave like a racist, people will think you are a racist. They have both been told numerous times that they are behaving like racists. Now that it appears that it will affect their reputation and their finances, they suddenly discover that some people might think they are racist just because they are acting like racists, so they plead ignorance and apologize.
    No. Just no.

  18. I don’t think the apologies means anything without genuine change either and left a comment at P’gon to the effect that I hoped this would prompt re-examination of her previous attitudes and actions on Amanda’s part. I am conscious that even if she and Seal Press were suddenly clue in and realize how much damage they had done in all of the previous interactions about the cover, about the immigration article, on Blackamazon’s blog etc, that that history of dismissal and of universalizing each individual voice raised against them as “women of colour are jealous joy killers” won’t just go away and has done a huge amount of harm.
    I realize this and I know that my response is inadequate. I don’t know how to centralize the focus on the ways that this oppresses women of colour without slipping into appropriation of that experience or making universalising statements about that experience (something I have been guilty of very recently) and so, you are so right, Firefly, this ends up becoming all about what the white women do, their words and their actions. I just wanted to acknowledge that that is inadequate. I’m trying to work on a better way.

  19. I too was careful in my wording. Notice the scare quotes around the word ‘thank’.
    You still didn’t answer my question about what you saw yourselves achieving by doing that.
    Su, talking to “white allies” about this is so exasperating that, at this point, all I have to say is put up or shut up. I’ve had my fill of white guilt and faffing about wondering “what can we do?”
    Women of colour have been telling white feminists what they can do for decades. If white feminists have ignored those calls for action, there comes a point when it’s clear that white feminists won’t listen, won’t act, no matter how much outreach woc do.

  20. You still didn’t answer my question about what you saw yourselves achieving by doing that.

    All I was hoping to achieve by calling out Seal Press in their own space was to try to make it clear that they don’t have a unanimous pile of white feminists fawning over them and accepting the apology on behalf of women of colour. It was a choice between standing by and staying silent, or not staying silent. Taking public issue with their pseudo-apology absolutely wasn’t intended as a back-pat. If it came across that way, maybe I need to change my writing. (Again, it was done very late at night, in a complete brainfog, kinda like now.)

    Su, talking to “white allies” about this is so exasperating that, at this point, all I have to say is put up or shut up. I’ve had my fill of white guilt and faffing about wondering “what can we do?”

    All I really have access to, action-wise, is this blog and my words and my relationship with the online world. I’m going to keep working on being a better ally. Possibly it’s of no use at all, but I’m going to keep doing it.

  21. You still didn’t answer my question about what you saw yourselves achieving by doing that.

    I didn’t think of it in terms of achieving anything. I used to be a regular commentor at Pandagon when I first started blogging. Amanda and I have corresponded. I felt a social obligation to acknowledge, in public on the blog because we largely have a public relationship, that she had done the decent thing with this apology.
    An apology is not the same as making amends, of course. I am skeptical of whether either Amanda or Seal Press will be capable of adequately making amends. There still seem to be many blind spots that have not been addressed in their statements, particularly with respect to blackamazon and brownfemipower, whose criticisms have been disappeared due to the louder criticisms of the illustrations.
    Of course, I still have my own blind spots. It feels like I’m in the middle of tripping over one right now. I’m listening.

  22. All I really have access to, action-wise

    Just a clarification, here, in case you’re not a regular reader and this sounds like hand-wringing helpless hyperbole: this is all I have in actuality, not as a rhetorical device. I have a severe disability, and my outings are brief and infrequent. Real-life organising and activism is not an option.

  23. Lauredhel,
    You began that ‘call out’ with “Good for you”. To me that reads as code that it is other white feminists whose approval needs to be sought by Brooke and Krista, and that you are indicating your availability to give or withdraw it. Given that it’s racism they’re being called out for, I don’t think that’s really appropriate.
    It also echoes a lot of comments made by prominent white bloggers such as Ampersand, Plain(s)feminist and Hugo Schwyzer which do explicitly thank them for their apology.
    Blackamazon shut down her blog, in part because no apology was made to her, whose blog it started on in the first place. What kind of blogosphere is it where white feminists create an atmosphere whereby they are only accountable to one another for racism?
    The main division in the Pandagon thread is the same, but more pronounced: white people who are supportive of Amanda against the “circular firing squad” and those who tut and wring their hands about what should be done. Again with the lack of accountability and the derailing of important race issues.
    I would suggest that instead of centring the actions of white women, it should be the actions of women of colour that come first. That white women should put aside their guilt, shame, whatever and just listen and act. It’s really not so hard as it’s made out to be.

  24. You began that ‘call out’ with “Good for you”.

    I tried to explicitly limit that with “for owning up to it” – i.e. for not jumping in and shifting the responsibility for the fuckup onto someone else and/or saying nothing at all. If that didn’t come across, it didn’t work. Sorry.
    I can’t help but feeling irritated at being equated/compared/lumped in with Amp and Hugo, creepy weasel men I completely and publicly despise. I’m asking for one courtesy – please don’t put me in that bucket. I don’t ally with them, and never have. (I don’t know plainsfeminist at all.)
    The rest of what you say, I agree with. If white women as a whole don’t start listening, soon there will be nothing and no one to listen to.

  25. I would suggest that instead of centring the actions of white women, it should be the actions of women of colour that come first. That white women should put aside their guilt, shame, whatever and just listen and act. It’s really not so hard as it’s made out to be.

    Listening – I’ve been doing a lot of lurking on WOC blogs lately. I just subscribed to your blog-feed the day before you commented here. I know the principles, but I don’t know the details of the work.
    Acting – I feel pretty ineffectual in larger activism. I’ve marched a few times, not much more than that. I comment on what other white feminists do because I don’t want to be complicitly silent when other people exhibit racist behaviours. But I don’t want to do what you’ve pointed out either: making it all about how WFs feel about our own racist behaviours.
    Is there a way to walk the line?

  26. The blog might be going off the air shortly – we’re running out of bandwith and my webhost’s support staff haven’t got back to me since my call earlier this morning.

  27. What kind of blogosphere is it where white feminists create an atmosphere whereby they are only accountable to one another for racism?
    “Only accountable to one another for racism” sucks. “Accountable to one another for racism” would be a huge step in the right direction.
    And yeah, it’s a fine line.

  28. Lauredhel said:

    I can’t help but feeling irritated at being equated/compared/lumped in with Amp and Hugo, creepy weasel men I completely and publicly despise. I’m asking for one courtesy – please don’t put me in that bucket. I don’t ally with them, and never have.

    Do you think that’s gonna make a difference to Brooke or Krista? In terms of your whiteness, your preference for allying or not allying with Amp and Hugo doesn’t make much of a difference. Whether they’re “creepy weasel men” or true and genuine allies, they are still white voices that took it upon themselves to approve of an apology for a racist action without any consultation with any poc.
    tigtog said:

    Acting – I feel pretty ineffectual in larger activism. I’ve marched a few times, not much more than that. I comment on what other white feminists do because I don’t want to be complicitly silent when other people exhibit racist behaviours. But I don’t want to do what you’ve pointed out either: making it all about how WFs feel about our own racist behaviours.
    Is there a way to walk the line?

    I didn’t say anything specifically about activism, because I myself am an activist and I know very well how limited it can be (especially for working mothers, people with disabilities, people living outside the inner west, etc.). But I have to say that it feels strange to me to be talking with feminists in the same city who don’t know about all the kinds of feminist/women’s activism that happens. Perhaps that’s a reflection of my own limitations.
    If you take blogging as a form of action, then all it amounts to is blogging more about women of colour and integrating more analysis of racial/ethnic/class/national specificities into an understanding of “women”. (See, I told you it wasn’t hard.) It’s a bit more difficult to do in Australia, but not impossible.
    Fire Flys last blog post..Warning! The new WordPress feature is utter trollbait

  29. Well I did just link to you in my most recent post, but it was your post about the new “feature” on WordPress.com 🙂
    Lauredhel and I live just about as far apart as it’s possible to live in Oz, BTW: I’m in Sydney, she’s in Perth. I’m not sure where you live (not asking you to tell), so which “same city” did you mean?
    The last explicitly feminist function I went to was a fundraiser for Emily’s List, which is part of exactly the same problem – very much dominated by the voices of white women of the middle classes. More balanced electoral representation is not an invalid avenue for feminist activism, but it’s certainly not the only one worth pursuing, so I need to be more active in looking for more grassroots feminist work.
    This conversation has at least spurred me to do what’s been on the back of my mind for months – wash the bags of outgrown warm kids’ clothes so that I can take them to the nearest women’s refuge.

  30. I’m gonna be a bit of a bitch here and say I don’t believe all this was “accidental”. There are exactly 12.683.750 styles of images and they chose one specifically that is both sexist AND racist??? No matter how you slice it, this pictures are NOT appropiate for a book about feminism. Even if you took the aboriginal people off, there’s still sexism there. Are they gonna defend themselves saying that they didn’t think about sexism when making a feminist book???
    This whole things smells to a marketing ploy. They are getting lots of people to talk about this, which is always good in “advertising” terms. And they knew that the audience would be very critical and wouldn’t keep quiet about it. It’s aimed at FEMINISTS, for chrissake!
    As I said, I don’t believe it was an “accident”.
    Mary Tracy9s last blog post..Bin the Goddamn Bunny!

  31. Mary Tracy9: you might be more cynical than most (and I’m not saying that’s a bad thing), but I don’t think you’re completely alone in your general point.
    See, for example, ”Minor Changes and Reasons for Them” at Tiny Cat Pants.

  32. W/R/T blogging, you can count the number of Australian woc bloggers on one hand with some fingers to spare. Blogging is not the medium where women of colour in Australia communicate what’s going on with us. So reading and linking isn’t the mode that those issues can be engaged or “brought into” the blogosphere (if that’s even a healthy way of engaging them). News articles occasionally report on refugee women, immigrant women and Aboriginal women, but it’s not regular and it’s within quite a white-patriarchal framing. I know a lot of women of colour who go out of their way to find international news that reflects more of their concerns… This is not something you can engage within your comfort zone, and there are a lot of obstacles, because the very notion of “writing about women of colour” is an ideologically charged one, and the silence contributes to the continued oppression of woc.
    Fire Flys last blog post..Warning! The new WordPress feature is utter trollbait

  33. W/R/T blogging, you can count the number of Australian woc bloggers on one hand with some fingers to spare.

    Yours is the only blog here in Aus. that I know of, Firefly. Are there others I haven’t found?

    This is not something you can engage within your comfort zone, and there are a lot of obstacles, because the very notion of “writing about women of colour” is an ideologically charged one, and the silence contributes to the continued oppression of woc.

    I think this gets to the heart of what I was concerned about in my comment upthread. I remember a comment somewhere, I think, by Blackamazon where she said that black communities in the US were the most talked about, analysed, dissected. I really got the sense of a parallel with the inigenous communities here and the constant reiteration of words like ‘emergency’ in the media representations.

  34. W/R/T blogging, you can count the number of Australian woc bloggers on one hand with some fingers to spare.

    I’m counting from my NNW (and correct me if I’m wrong) you, hexy, Durrmu Arts, Thriving in the Desert. (Remote Life? Not sure.) Possibly/probably more on livejournal.

    Blogging is not the medium where women of colour in Australia communicate what’s going on with us. So reading and linking isn’t the mode that those issues can be engaged or “brought into” the blogosphere (if that’s even a healthy way of engaging them). News articles occasionally report on refugee women, immigrant women and Aboriginal women, but it’s not regular and it’s within quite a white-patriarchal framing. I know a lot of women of colour who go out of their way to find international news that reflects more of their concerns… This is not something you can engage within your comfort zone, and there are a lot of obstacles, because the very notion of “writing about women of colour” is an ideologically charged one, and the silence contributes to the continued oppression of woc.

    This is definitely a binary that I think leads to some people feeling a bit stuck? (and which can segue into the guilty-paralysis mess). And there’s ignorance to confront along with it – I just know almost nothing about some areas and situations (product of upbringing, biased geography learning, my own choices about educational course both formal and informal -all this is privilege-marinated ) – eg I didn’t write about Burma/Myanmar or The Congo recently when it was in the news/’sphere, because I just don’t know the first thing about them, and to get to anywhere like a useful level of knowledge is going to take me quite a while. (Working on it, slowly.)So going outside that comfort zone would mean talking about something I know _nothing_ about, and that feels really disrespectful. I’m getting rambly here…pulling it back. yes, speaking may be fraught, but being silent is being part of the problem.
    How to listen to non-blogosphere voices is a big one right there. In the past I’ve done this in bits and pieces, seeking out poetry and speeches and such. The problem being that that tends to be rather one-way, though.
    Friends of mine went to a YMCA-run combined council today, Noongar women and white Perth women. (The Y says they’re working on their white-centredness too). The friends will I think be writing reports on their LJs, which I will point to with permission, and any other reports I can find.
    Lauredhels last blog post..Fat is a macronutrient, not a sin: Act Three

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