Femmostroppo Reader (Scitech Edition) – December 7, 2009

Items of interest found recently in my RSS feed. What did I miss? Please share what you've been reading (and writing!) in the comments.

http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/7nnVQ2fROOg&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&border=1

“As you’ll see, very few commentators who jumped on the conspiracy bandwagon even before reading the e-mails managed to get it right. “

  • “Donation” and “Welfare” States
  • – Interesting

  • Jon Stewart And Michael Specter On Vaccine Rejectionism
  • – classic

  • Tennant’s and Stewart’s Hamlet to air this month
  • – “Are you a scifi+ Shakespeare dork?” – so far only airing in the UK, although this probably means a DVD is not far behind

  • Identity Wars: Google & Yahoo! Bow to Facebook & Twitter
  • – via Tamaleaver, who says – “This is a really interesting article looking at what happens when Facebook and Twitter become default identity authentication systems – so much power then resides in these systems, and what happens to attempts at standards like OpenID?”

  • The ScienceBlogs collective teams up with National Geographic
  • – In case you missed hearing about this

  • Comic 009: Faaaat.
  • – Nice one

  • Writing Tips: Writing Accurate Descriptions
  • – Ever read a book and been rudely shoved out of the narrative by a descriptive howler from the author? Isn’t it annoying? Maria Langer offers some suggestions for authors to make sure that doesn’t happen to their readers.

  • Global warming emails: followup
  • – Phil Plait: “I called this a non-event because it has no real impact on global warming science or our understanding of it. Of course it has a huge impact, politically. But that’s because the ideologues out there have seized on this and made as much noise as they can, so in that sense it is an issue — an issue of how political science has become, how easy it is to disrupt the process, and the effect this has had on the scientists themselves. This issue won’t go away any time soon, but we need to focus on the signal, not the noise.”

  • Aron-Ra in the flesh
  • – Spend 11 minutes on YouTube with Aron-Ra to hear and see the clear demonstration of why creationist leaders are obviously dishonest, not just deluded.

  • the perpetuation of myth
  • – shiny found a news article with a misleading heading (no!) about a study on men and porn, and the news editor has challenged her to find a better one. Go see what you come up with.

Disclaimer/SotBO: a link here is not necessarily an endorsement of all opinions of the post author(s) either in the particular post or of their writing in general.


Categories: linkfest

Tags: , , ,

5 replies

  1. A descriptive howler I come across frequently is a crescent moon that rises at dusk/sets at dawn. Astronomically impossible Margaret Atwood and others ! (I’m giving Terry Pratchett a pass because I figure there may be some discworld explanation for this that I don’t know about).

  2. I’m quite terrified of that challenge from the online ed, so all helping hands are quite welcome.
    On global warming, Turnbull described Abbott’s policy as an “environmental figleaf” in the Oz today. That turn of phrase makes me really like the man, surprisingly enough.

  3. Uhh… as I already pointed out on the Waters of Mars thread, the Hamlet DVD is released on 4th January. You can pre-book a copy on Amazon.co.uk

    • @DEM,
      Ah, I knew I’d seen that a DVD was coming soon somewhere on here, I just couldn’t remember who had said it on which thread (and I should have realised it was that one).
      @Maria,
      thanks for dropping by, and glad you liked the phrase 🙂

  4. First, thanks for the link.
    Second, I love the phrase “descriptive howler.” Glad someone finds it as annoying as I do.
    Third, I agree that you can’t have a crescent moon rising at dusk and setting at dawn. That would be a full or nearly full moon. It’s an excellent example of a writer not getting real world fact straight.
    Thanks again!
    Maria

%d bloggers like this: