Hands up anyone who was offended

Few Complaints over Chaser song:

According to a report by News Limited this morning, irate viewers called ABC to complain about the song and talkback radio had also been inundated with comments.

But Taylor said he was not aware of a large number of complaints.

“As of 10 minutes ago, there had only been six official calls to the ABC [about the song], and three were to say congratulations,” he said.

“The song was intending to make a point about people who are flawed in life who are disproportionately hailed as saints in death.

I thought there was also more than a little underlining of just how our defamation laws constrain comment while people we privately think are [insert epithet here] are still living. (This is not to say that defamation suits shouldn’t exist for the defence of reputations, just that they are known to have been overused by certain litigious personalities. There aren’t that many people who want to end up paying for the latest household renovations of those we excoriate.)

For those of you who missed it, the video is after the cut. Fair warning: the lyrics are definitely Not Safe For Some Workplaces.



Categories: arts & entertainment, ethics & philosophy, law & order, relationships, Sociology

Tags: , , , , ,

6 replies

  1. I think everyone is just rolling their eyes.
    I do agree with Rudd that the Chaser needs to lift its game. They’ve really been going downhill the last month or two. Not really that funny. At least Newstopia has come to fill the quality satire void.
    Anyway it wasn’t even new material. It seemed familiar while I watched it and I just realised they used the song in Dead Caesar which they were performing at the Sydney Theatre Company.
    Still I’m curious as to what Howard’s idea of humour is after he said “Why don’t they stick to decent, dirt-free humour that we can all enjoy.”

  2. Oh really, if Howard and Rudd *weren’t* critising the Chaser, THAT would mean they weren’t doing their job.
    And I for one am sick of the cult of St Bloody Steve Irwin. More power to them for poking fun and pointing out the truth about how we idolise dead celebrities just cause they were famous and now they’re dead. I’m with Germaine on this one.

  3. I’ve never liked the Chaser, on the grounds that they are just too blokey (more boys perpetually ecstatic about their own cleverness), but I must say I found this HILARIOUS. However, I was shocked and stunned to find that there was no Ronald Regan / Pope John Paul II verse.

  4. As I said at LP, I found this funny, except for the Princess Di joke, because it relied more on misogyny, rather than making fun of the hypocritical attitudes of mourners/actions of the deceased.

  5. Anyway it wasn’t even new material. It seemed familiar while I watched it and I just realised they used the song in Dead Caesar which they were performing at the Sydney Theatre Company.

    I haven’t ever seen them on stage, so I didn’t realise this was prior art. Still, that’s typical for comedy performers: everyone incorporates their stage material in their TV performances.
    Interesting though that not a single media reviewer of the stage show apparently thought the song offensive enough to warrant a mention in print at that time.

  6. Well, I wasn’t offended. I found the song hilarious. Truth hurts; some of the Saintly Departed aren’t so saintly after all.
    The only thing I was offended about was the predicable howling from shock-jocks (to increase their ratings) and pollies (to improve their pollings).
    Barbed political and social satire is bound to offend some people, but in my opinion, we as a country need someone to stir us up.

%d bloggers like this: