The Queensland Police say I’d be a crim…

HomerChokingBart…. if I so much as watched the baby-swinging video. (Please don’t post any direct links to the material here.)

In a statement, Queensland Police said the term “child-abuse material” even extended to clips in which a child “appears” to be a victim of cruelty. […]

Queensland Police said it was a crime “to participate in the exploitation and abuse of children by seeking to view, possess, make or distribute child-abuse or child exploitation material”.

It provided a definition of “child-abuse material”, which was any material that shows a person under the age of 18 who “is, or appears to be, a victim of torture, cruelty or physical abuse”.

Bearing in mind also that we’re now under orders that cartoon characters are “people” too, can we name some mainstream movies and TV shows that are now a crime to watch, according to the Queensland cops?

The Simpsons, for a start, as Homer is seen frequently strangling Bart.

Buffy would be out, with all that hand-to-hand fighting involving teenagers against adults.

And Harry Potter, who is the victim of a number of attempts on his life and a whole mess of sinister plots.

What else?



Categories: ethics & philosophy, law & order, violence

Tags: , , , , , ,

12 replies

  1. Funniest home video type shows spring immediately to my mind.
    mimbles’s last blog post..Someone should do something

  2. The news is an age old classic, what about those today/tonight shows where they go on about how horrible people are with video evidence?
    What about documentaries about the ineffectiveness of smacking kids, would that count?
    On a lighter note I’m guessing it’ll be illegal to watch tiny-toons ever again.
    Ooh ooh! Dragon Ball! Dragon ball Z in particular, in that series the kid didn’t even WANT to fight!
    Man, you could just keep on going forever with this couldn’t you?

  3. All those programs of sports
    – nasty rough and cruel to the poor ‘children’ involved.

  4. All those programs of sports
    – nasty rough and cruel to the poor ‘children’ involved.

  5. Well, soon they won’t be able to report bad news at all. Orwell just might get the last laugh after all.
    But look on the bright side: they won’t be able to show Supernanny any more.

  6. The Exorcist.

  7. Pretty much most news programs, e.g. shots showing child starvation in Zimbabwe [insert name of impoverished nation here], under 18’s involved in violent protests [insert name of country with civil unrest here], under 18’s involved in rough sports, docos uncovering the huge inadequacies of child welfare showing child sufferers etc. The censorship trend in AU at the moment rlly worries me, as does the idea that the gov’t/courts should be able to decide what THEY think is acceptable for us ( the discretion in censoring clips where “children appear to be the victims of cruelty” is wayyyyyy to broad). Children DO suffer from violence and i fear if we remove images of this suffering people might start presuming it somehow doesn’t exist, or that we’ll lose awareness of it 😦

  8. Yes, but remember this is the state where a tuckshop queue of more than three becomes an ‘illegal demonstration’…

  9. Children DO suffer from violence and i fear if we remove images of this suffering people might start presuming it somehow doesn’t exist, or that we’ll lose awareness of it 😦
    This is already the case unfortunately. I’ve tutored a few children’s literature courses, and it’s not at all uncommon for students to write in their essays something like, “Children’s books must have a happy ending because childhood is a time of innocence and wonder, and children must be protected from grim reality.” I am always rather quick to point out that this is a rather narrow view of privileged Western childhood (and even that isn’t always happy), but the view persists. Of course, it would be quite correct to say that the prevalence of happy endings in Western children’s literature (this is not true of children’s lit from China or Japan, for instance) can be attributed to ideological assumptions that childhood is a time of innocence, but that is not the way that students tend to frame it– frequently, they just accept those assumptions.
    And yeah, this censorship trend is really very disturbing. I wonder if walking around with that picture of Bart and Homer, or a screencap from a Harry Potter movie could be taken as an act of civil disobedience.

  10. Well it should see the end of Australia’s Funniest Home Videos. With any luck.

  11. Hmm. Don’t know if it’s a sign, but that cartoon of Homer choking Bart has disappeared…
    Deus Ex Macintosh’s last blog post..US Presidential Handover

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