Woman “brain-damaged” by Amazing Hydration Diet detox

barbaranash Image: Culpable “nutritionist” Barbara Nash. Source: Daily Mail.

BBC: “Woman left brain damaged by detox”:

A woman has been awarded more than £800,000 after she suffered permanent brain damage while on a detox diet.

The High Court heard Dawn Page, 52, began vomiting uncontrollably after starting The Amazing Hydration Diet.

[…]

The court heard Mrs Page, from Faringdon, near Swindon, claimed Mrs Nash told her to drink large amounts of water and reduce her salt intake when she started the diet in October 2001.

She told the High Court that when she started vomiting Mrs Nash told her it was a normal part of the detoxification process.

The Australian continues:

The nutritionist told her to continue with the diet, increase her water intake further and cut out even more salt.

Days later she suffered a serious epileptic fit and brain damage caused by sodium deficiency, the report said. Nutritional therapist Barbara Nash continues to deny any fault in the case, following the payout from her insurance company, which was made without mention of liability.

The Australian makes a point of telling us that her husband said she was not obese, “but like a lot of women, Dawn liked to look after her weight”.

This is all horrible, and inexcusable: that she was ignored, and brow-beaten into self-torture, and has been left with life-altering cognitive and mood problems because of it.

I wish Ms Page all the best, hope that her “nutritionist” and “life coach” Barbara Nash never works with humans again, and hope that the world soon gets over this obsession with women needing to take up less and less and less space no matter what the cost.



Categories: gender & feminism, health

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8 replies

  1. I always thought the whole “detox” thing was aimed at making women more “virtuous” by reducing the consequences of this contaminated world on their bodies, or something like that.
    Maybe they later realized they could make more moneys by marketing it as a dieting trick?

  2. There’s an awful lot of moneys in marketing almost anything as a dieting trick.

  3. This woman couldn’t have the slightest knowledge of nutrition (ha, she calls herself a nutritionalist according to Kiwi FM but I dunno), how thick are you to tell someone to cut out salt and drink up to 5 litres a day? Poor bastard

  4. The way I read the BBC report was that the nutritionist had suggested the client drink 4 pints (just over 2 and 1/4 litres) of water a day and cut out added salt. I hope that she was given directives to eat healthy food as well but from the article it is unclear. There is sufficient sodium in plant food for someone drinking this amount of water to not have an electrolyte imbalance, unless they were in a very hot environment or exercising.
    When the client was admitted to hospital she had obviously drunk far more than advised. More than double the amount of water. Who’s fault is that?
    A true detox, supervised by someone who knows what they are doing and for a limited amount of time can have some health benefits however most people use it as some extreme crash diet rather than about rebalancing their body. I do it every spring and not for weight loss. In the right circumstances there is nothing inherently harmful about cutting out additives, eating unrefined plant foods and drinking only water for a few days (unless you are pregnant, diabetic, on certain medications or working hard at the time). But what has been popularised as a “detox” is something else.
    another outspoken females last blog post..knitting in unexpected places

  5. another outspoken female, you may have missed the bit where she was very unwell (ingesting a physiological amount of water, salt, and plant food does not cause vomiting). The “nutritionist” then told her to drink more water and reduce salt further; and as far as I can tell, the reason she gave was that the symptoms were caused by toxins that needed to be flushed out, which is complete bullshit.
    In addition, whether the client knew the difference between pints and litres or not, someone competently supervising a drastic crash diet and high-water regimen[1] should make sure that their client knows exactly how to go about it without risking their life; and then if it’s going pear-shaped they need to figure out why, not fob the client off with vacuous mumbo-jumbo about “detoxification” symptoms.
    The larger problem with (a) women being made to think that they need fad diets, and (b) that they need to ridiculous amounts of water goes far beyond this individual client-provider relationship. Many, many fad diet sites, books, and folktales say “drink lots and lots of water” or “every time you’re hungry, drink water” with no warnings of the (very well known, within medical fields) risk of life-threatening hyponatremia.
    I wonder whether this woman was on medication that exacerbated the problem, and whether the nutritionist even enquired about that.

    [1] Well, there is no way to competently supervise a crash diet, but you know what I mean.

  6. the symptoms were caused by toxins that needed to be flushed out, which is complete bullshit.

    Oh thank God, I’ve been waiting years to hear someone else say that (apart from me, I mean). The trouble with being an old hippie is that most of your closest friends are too, and the “alternative” thing never really goes away.

  7. Mary Tracy9:

    I always thought the whole “detox” thing was aimed at making women more “virtuous” by reducing the consequences of this contaminated world on their bodies, or something like that.
    Maybe they later realized they could make more moneys by marketing it as a dieting trick?

    “And by ‘toxins’, we mean FAT!!”

  8. I’ve always equated it with the douching obsession. The healthy vagina, like the healthy (interior) body, is a self-cleansing mechanism, so you have to make a real effort to make people feel internally dirty and poisoned so you can take their money off them.

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